Jim Crawford received his B.S. in Mathematics from the United States Military Academy in 1986 and his Ph.D. in Atmospheric Chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1997. Since that time, he has been a research scientist at NASA’s Langley Research Center. From the start of his graduate studies in 1991 and throughout his career, his research has been associated with airborne field studies conducted across the globe by NASA’s Tropospheric Chemistry Program and collaborating partners.



IGAC has a strong focus on engaging the next generation of atmospheric scientists through its early career program.  These scientists join an international network early in their career that creates relationships that facilitate atmospheric chemistry research at an international level for years to come.

IGAC cultivates the next generation of scientists by:


Hiroshi Tanimoto is the Head of Global Atmospheric Chemistry Section at National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) in Tsukuba, Japan. He received his PhD in Chemistry from The University of Tokyo in 2001 and was a visiting scholar at Harvard University during 2007–2008. Dr. Tanimoto has been working in the field of atmospheric composition in Asia and Oceania regions.



Mark Lawrence is a scientific director of the cluster “Sustainable Interactions With the Atmosphere” (SIWA) at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS, www.iass-potsdam.de) in Potsdam, Germany.



Although Monsoon Asia is one of the current “frontiers” for atmospheric chemistry, the region is not well connected to the international science community. Corresponding to emerging environmental issues including severe air pollution, the atmospheric chemistry community in Monsoon Asia is rapidly growing at both national and international levels, and policymakers need scientific evidence and support. However, there is large asymmetry between countries.


This working group is brand new in 2018 and is being founded in order to:

  • Provide a forum for scientists to discuss particular challenges in understanding the Southern Hemisphere atmosphere &
  • To foster stronger collaborations between Southern Hemisphere research groups.

Current Activities:


Quantification of chemical emissions into the air is a key step in explaining observed variability and trends in atmospheric composition and in attributing these observed changes to their causes on local to global scales. Accurate emissions data are necessary to identify feasible controls that reduce adverse impacts associated with air quality and climate, to track the success of implemented policies, and to estimate future impacts.


Increasingly, the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere and troposphere are being studied and modeled as a single entity in global models. As evidence, in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment Report (IPCC AR5), several groups performed simulations in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) using global models with interactive chemistry spanning the surface through the stratosphere and above.


With the view that improving the understanding of atmospheric science in Africa would have large impacts on key societal issues for the continent (e.g. air quality, human health, agriculture, climate change), the African Group on Atmospheric Sciences (ANGA) working group has been established and is under development.


Wet and dry deposition of chemical species to the earth’s surface plays an essential role in controlling the concentration of gases and aerosols in the troposphere. The chemical composition of atmospheric deposition provides important information on many interacting physical and chemical mechanisms in the atmosphere such as emission sources, atmospheric dynamics and transport, atmospheric removal processes, and nutrient cycling in ecosystems.